Fixing the World’s Aquarium

My first formal mural project was a single day venture in the Dominican Republic. After hours of painting alone, local kids joined in and pretty soon it became a community effort with lots of input about how species and landscapes should be portrayed. The aim of the mural was to raise awareness about the interconnected nature of the coastal marine environment and about a local coral restoration project.
My first formal mural project was a single day venture in the Dominican Republic. After hours of painting alone, local kids joined in and pretty soon it became a community effort with lots of input about how species and landscapes should be portrayed. The aim of the mural was to raise awareness about the interconnected nature of the coastal marine environment and about a local coral restoration project.
A local boy in Punta Rucia, a fishing village of the northern Dominican Republic, does the difficult adult work of skinning a dozen moray eels that were part of the day’s catch. Much of my work has revolved around small scale fisheries and has revealed to me the passion and dedication of those who rely most directly on a functional ecosystem, and their consequent potential to change the way we manage our oceans at a regional and global scale.
A local boy in Punta Rucia, a fishing village of the northern Dominican Republic, does the difficult adult work of skinning a dozen moray eels that were part of the day’s catch. Much of my work has revolved around small scale fisheries and has revealed to me the passion and dedication of those who rely most directly on a functional ecosystem, and their consequent potential to change the way we manage our oceans at a regional and global scale.
At the PC Field Station in Kino Bay, Sonora, Mexico, a small fishing town in the Midriff Island Region of the Northern Gulf of California, I was exposed to the Traditional Ecological Knowledge of the indigenous Comcaac/Seri people and befriended a tribal elder named Alfredo Lopez (above) and his wife, a tribal healer named Cleotilda, both of whom passed on around 2016. In 2019, I revisited Kino Bay and  met Alfredo and Cleotilda’s granddaughter, Claudia, who is following in the tradition of her grandmother as a medicine-woman. Claudia was so kind as to introduce me to tribal elder and Shaman Chapo Barnett, who urged me to continue in my mission to bring awareness to the plight of nature – a powerful reminder of why I had set out on a career in conservation.
At the PC Field Station in Kino Bay, Sonora, Mexico, a small fishing town in the Midriff Island Region of the Northern Gulf of California, I was exposed to the Traditional Ecological Knowledge of the indigenous Comcaac/Seri people and befriended a tribal elder named Alfredo Lopez (above) and his wife, a tribal healer named Cleotilda, both of whom passed on around 2016. In 2019, I revisited Kino Bay and met Alfredo and Cleotilda’s granddaughter, Claudia, who is following in the tradition of her grandmother as a medicine-woman. Claudia was so kind as to introduce me to tribal elder and Shaman Chapo Barnett, who urged me to continue in my mission to bring awareness to the plight of nature – a powerful reminder of why I had set out on a career in conservation.

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